Curly of Oster

biocanvas:

A 60-times magnified view of Neurospora crassa, commonly known as bread mold.
Image by Gabriela Roca, University of Edinburgh.

biocanvas:

A 60-times magnified view of Neurospora crassa, commonly known as bread mold.

Image by Gabriela Roca, University of Edinburgh.

lostbeasts:

Triconodon eating Sapheosaurus, by Zdenek Burian.

lostbeasts:

Triconodon eating Sapheosaurus, by Zdenek Burian.

the-star-stuff:

Curiosity Sends Back Incredible Hi-Res Views of Mt. Sharp
This image, released today, is a high-resolution shot of the Curiosity rover’s ultimate goal: the stratified flanks of Gale Crater’s 3.4-mile (5.5-km) high central peak, Mount Sharp. The image was taken with Curiosity’s 100mm telephoto Mastcam as a calibration test.
Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech 

the-star-stuff:

Curiosity Sends Back Incredible Hi-Res Views of Mt. Sharp

This image, released today, is a high-resolution shot of the Curiosity rover’s ultimate goal: the stratified flanks of Gale Crater’s 3.4-mile (5.5-km) high central peak, Mount Sharp. The image was taken with Curiosity’s 100mm telephoto Mastcam as a calibration test.

Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech 

sinobug:

Small Green Awlet (Burara amara, Hesperiidae), adult and caterpillar

The Small Green Awlet is a species of hesperid butterfly or skipper found in Northeast India and Southeast Asia.

Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies, moths, skippers and caterpillars on my Flickr page
HERE

(via insectlove)

staceythinx:

Some of the crazy creatures from Claire Nouvian’s 2007 book The Deep

About the book:

On dry land, most organisms are confined to the surface, or at most to altitudes of a hundred meters—the height of the tallest trees. In the oceans, though, living space has both vertical and horizontal dimensions: with an average depth of 3800 meters, the oceans offer 99% of the space on Earth where life can develop. And the deep sea, which has been immersed in total darkness since the dawn of time, occupies 85% of ocean space, forming the planet’s largest habitat. Yet these depths abound with mystery. The deep sea is mostly uncharted—only about 5 percent of the seafloor has been mapped with any reasonable degree of detail—and we know very little about the creatures that call it home. Current estimates about the number of species yet to be found vary between ten and thirty million. The deep sea no longer has anything to prove; it is without doubt Earth’s largest reservoir of life.

Combining the latest scientific discoveries with astonishing color imagery, The Deep takes readers on a voyage into the darkest realms of the ocean. Revealing nature’s oddest and most mesmerizing creatures in crystalline detail, The Deep features more than two hundred color photographs of terrifying sea monsters, living fossils, and ethereal bioluminescent creatures, some photographed here for the very first time. Accompanying these breathtaking photographs are contributions from some of the world’s most respected researchers that examine the biology of deep-sea organisms, the ecology of deep-sea habitats, and the history of deep-sea exploration.

(via ifveniceissinking)

mrrscience:

The Chrysina aurigans [left] and Chrysina limbata [right] specimens shown here bear such an uncanny resemblance to polished nuggets of gold and silver it may be hard to believe that their exoskeletons are made of the same stuff—chitin—that covers drab cockroaches and crayfish. These beetles shine not because of chemical pigmentation or the incorporation of actual metals. Instead, a closer look at their elytra—the hard forewings that conceal the beetles’ more delicate hindwings—reveals a multilayer nanostructure that tricks the light in just the right way to create metallic effects. In a study published April 22 in Optical Materials Express, researchers from the University of Costa Rica provide new details of this structural color. The beetles’ elytra has a so-called “chirped structure” consisting of some 70 layers of chitin stacked from top to bottom in decreasing thicknesses. The layers have different refractive indices, and incoming light waves are bent and reflected at each interface. Constructive interference of reflected rays intensifies their brightness and color. Using a special spectrometer designed to measure the light reflecting from the curved surface of the elytra, researchers found that the silver beetle reflects light across the entire visible spectrum whereas the golden beetle reflects light of wavelengths larger than 515 nanometers—similar to the reflection spectra for the actual metals. Unlike other examples of structural color in nature, such as butterfly wings andpeacock feathers, the beetles do not iridesce—instead they appear a steady gold or silver from any angle. Their dewy appearance would make the beetles easy to miss in the rain-drenched forests of Costa Rica, the researchers hypothesize. Despite the resemblance, the beetles’ sheen does not result from the same process that makes metal shine. “Actual gold and silver optical properties are determined by the contributions of free and bound electrons to the absorption of light,” explains study co-author William Vargas. Replicating the chirped nanostructure using technology currently used to manufacture 3D photonic crystals might be possible, says Vargas. And if the beetle specimens shimmering in museum cases are any indication, these faux metallic coatings could last untarnished for hundreds of years. (via)

mrrscience:

The Chrysina aurigans [left] and Chrysina limbata [right] specimens shown here bear such an uncanny resemblance to polished nuggets of gold and silver it may be hard to believe that their exoskeletons are made of the same stuff—chitin—that covers drab cockroaches and crayfish. 

These beetles shine not because of chemical pigmentation or the incorporation of actual metals. Instead, a closer look at their elytra—the hard forewings that conceal the beetles’ more delicate hindwings—reveals a multilayer nanostructure that tricks the light in just the right way to create metallic effects. In a study published April 22 in Optical Materials Express, researchers from the University of Costa Rica provide new details of this structural color. 

The beetles’ elytra has a so-called “chirped structure” consisting of some 70 layers of chitin stacked from top to bottom in decreasing thicknesses. The layers have different refractive indices, and incoming light waves are bent and reflected at each interface. Constructive interference of reflected rays intensifies their brightness and color. Using a special spectrometer designed to measure the light reflecting from the curved surface of the elytra, researchers found that the silver beetle reflects light across the entire visible spectrum whereas the golden beetle reflects light of wavelengths larger than 515 nanometers—similar to the reflection spectra for the actual metals. 

Unlike other examples of structural color in nature, such as butterfly wings andpeacock feathers, the beetles do not iridesce—instead they appear a steady gold or silver from any angle. Their dewy appearance would make the beetles easy to miss in the rain-drenched forests of Costa Rica, the researchers hypothesize. 

Despite the resemblance, the beetles’ sheen does not result from the same process that makes metal shine. “Actual gold and silver optical properties are determined by the contributions of free and bound electrons to the absorption of light,” explains study co-author William Vargas. Replicating the chirped nanostructure using technology currently used to manufacture 3D photonic crystals might be possible, says Vargas. And if the beetle specimens shimmering in museum cases are any indication, these faux metallic coatings could last untarnished for hundreds of years. (via)

(Source: mattscienceclass, via invertebrate-science)